CONTEXTUAL PERFORMANCE (CP)

Contextual performance components are comprised of social and motivational behaviors rewarded within a company’s organizational control system which are monitored and evaluated along with technical skills to assess overall job performance.

WHAT IS CONTEXTUAL PERFORMANCE (CP)?

Contextual performance components are comprised of social and motivational behaviors rewarded within a company’s organizational control system which are monitored and evaluated along with technical skills to assess overall job performance.

Contextual performance is defined as the social and psychological behaviors, absent of formal rewards, of employees who work in the technical core of organizations .

Borman and Motowildo  first introduced the term contextual performance in 1993, and self-efficacy, interpersonal facilitation, dedication, and perceived competence each constitute components of contextual performance.  These components have been shown in recent research to have a marked impact on the OJP of IT professionals who work in organizations utilizing EA environments.

In 2011, Brownlee and Motowildo (seminal authors on this topic) proposed that by improving the overall performance of IT professionals, contextual performance components had the potential to positively impact the technical core, thereby contributing to the overall effectiveness of the organization.

performance_model

44%

Perceived Competence

34%

Interpersonal Facilitation

21%

Dedication

WHERE DOES CP FIT WITH IT PROFESSIONALS NOW?

Workplace performance associated with the social demands of team environments has been labeled contextual performance. The job performance of information technology (IT) professionals who work in enterprise architecture (EA) environments is routinely determined by assessing their technical and behavior skills.

Today, however, IT professionals face very different organizational challenges than IT professionals who worked in the same fields even a decade earlier.The job role of today’s IT professionals extends beyond proficiency in their technical field. IT professionals are now required to serve as productive members of integrated teams made up of professionals from various departments to ensure business processes and IT initiatives are aligned. 

Historically, the selection and evaluation criterion used in the IT profession have focused primarily on technical competencies due to the nature of IT professionals’ role-related technical tasks. Even though research on the job performance of technology professionals is limited, recent IT-business integration research has demonstrated that while technical proficiency is essential, behavioral skills are paramount when evaluating OJP. Organizations that implement EA expect IT staff to learn and evolve on the job as the technologies they work with evolve.

ITS EVALUATION TIME - HOW DO YOU MEASURE UP?

Success is ultimately determined based on an individual’s ability to assimilate successfully within the confines of the behavioral patterns set by the organization. Historically, IT professionals have been valued based on their technical acuity and known for their lacksuccess2 of social skills. The dated yet prevalent stereotype of the socially awkward IT professional may drive nontechnical teammates to perceive all IT professionals’ as being socially awkward, viewing behavioral attributes less favorably by basing them on preconceived notions that may or may not be factual. The work role definitions that professionals in organizations aspire to are based on the expectations of the social systems of the organizations in which they work.

Overall Job Performance is evaluated based (a) on successfully fulfilling the task (i.e., based on the criteria set by organizational expectations), and (b) contextual factors (i.e., the norms and rules shared by the members of the EA team on which an IT professional works). Success is ultimately determined based on an individual’s ability to assimilate successfully within the confines of the behavioral patterns set by the organization.

ASK YOURSELF THESE QUESTIONS:

  1. Am I able to a balance my technical and behavioral skills?
    answer:
  2. Am I able to interact with others (communicate and collaborate) effectively outside the IT department?
    answer:
  3. Are you a motivated/dedicated employee (volunteering and helping others- even when it’s not your job)?
    answer:
  4. Are you dedicated to attain high personal goals to meet your own internal standards of performance?
    answer:
  5. Are you enthusiastic, inspired, excited, and engaged in your work?
    answer:

WHAT NOW?

If you answered “No” to any of the questions above – you have room for improvement.

The bITa group can help you focus on you Contextual Component deficits and assist you reaching your goal of improvement.

What Can We Do For You?

More Contextual Performance Information